Traditional Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture

How does Traditional Chinese Medicine differ from Western medicine?

Accupuncture Services Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a complete medical system quite different from Western medicine. TCM has evolved over the last 2000 years at least, while modern medicine is much younger than that.
Several concepts in Chinese medicine have no counterpart in Western medicine. For example, the organs, organ systems, and organ functions in TCM are conceptualized differently from the physiological organs described by modern Western medicine. Furthermore, TCM describes 20 meridians, or channels, which run through the body. These channels carry qi and blood and balance yin and yang. Qi, which is pronounced “chi,” is the vital force that controls mental and physical functioning. Yin/yang theory and 5-Elements Theory are also important components of TCM philosophy.

The methods used to diagnose conditions in TCM also differ. Typically, the tongue and pulse are examined in detail to provide clues as to the patient’s condition and diagnosis. Diagnoses in Chinese medicine are referred to by the organ system affected, and the element that is imbalanced in that organ (for example, Liver Qi Stagnation).

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a complete medical system quite different from Western medicine. TCM has evolved over the last 2000 years at least, while modern medicine is much younger than that.

Several concepts in Chinese medicine have no counterpart in Western medicine. For example, the organs, organ systems, and organ functions in TCM are conceptualized differently from the physiological organs described by modern Western medicine. Furthermore, TCM describes 20 meridians, or channels, which run through the body. These channels carry qi and blood and balance yin and yang. Qi, which is pronounced “chi,” is the vital force that controls mental and physical functioning. Yin/yang theory and 5-Elements Theory are also important components of TCM philosophy.

The methods used to diagnose conditions in TCM also differ. Typically, the tongue and pulse are examined in detail to provide clues as to the patient’s condition and diagnosis. Diagnoses in Chinese medicine are referred to by the organ system affected, and the element that is imbalanced in that organ (for example, Liver Qi Stagnation).